Blending Instructions Using Penray Inhibitors

FOR CONVENTIONAL TECHNOLOGY

ONE: Bulk Penray Inhibitors should be well agitated before and during addition to the glycol. This will ensure that the antifoam, which tends to float, is thoroughly mixed in. This is especially important when blending antifreeze for sale in the state of Florida , which tests antifreeze by running the foam test.
TWO: Good agitation of the glycol is essential. A mixer or air sparge can be used. They glycol MUST be agitating BEFORE starting to add the Penray Inhibitor.
THREE: DO NOT exceed the following addition rates of the inhibitor into the glycol:
Batch Size (gals)
5,000
10,000
15,000
20,000
25,000
30,000

Addition Rate Per Minute
0.8 gals or 8 lbs.
1.6 gals or 16 lbs.
2.4 gals or 24 lbs.
3.2 gals or 32 lbs.
4.0 gals or 40 lbs.
5.0 gals or 50 lbs.

This translates into a total addition time of a little over 2 hours. Accidentally adding too fast can be avoided by using a narrow line (1″) and a low power pump. After the addition, the batch should be blended until the TA is in specification.
Adding the inhibitor too quickly or with inadequate agitation of the glycol can lead to silicate dropout.
FOUR: Penray inhibitor concentrates should NEVER be pre-blended into less than the final volume of glycol or have glycol added to them.

FIVE: While packaging, the antifreeze batch should be well agitated. This will ensure that each jug of antifreeze contains the proper amount of antifoam.

FOR HYBRID TECHNOLOGY (PENRAY 2705)

Glycol:

The entire required amount of glycol should be charged first. Penray inhibitor concentrates should never be pre-blended into less than the final volume of glycol or have glycol added to them. The glycol should be between 65 and 95 degrees Fahrenheit to completely dissolve the inhibitors in a reasonable amount of time. Agitation in the mixing tank should be good enough to form a vortex.

Liquid Addition (Penray 2705A):

All Penray liquid inhibitor packages should be well mixed before and during addition to the glycol. Proper mixing will ensure that the anti-foam ingredients, which tend to float, are completely incorporated into the batch. This is especially important when blending antifreeze for sale in the state of Florida where antifreeze is evaluated by running a foam test.

The agitation must be on in the glycol tank before starting to add the Penray inhibitor.

The Penray liquid inhibitor concentrate should be added slowly. Adjust the rate of addition so that it takes a little over 2 hours to add the full amount. Accidentally adding too fast can be avoided by using a narrow line (1″) and a low power pump. Adding the inhibitor too quickly or with inadequate agitation of the glycol can lead to silicate dropout.

Liquid addition must be complete before adding solids.

Powder Addition (Penray 2705 Part B):

The agitation must be on in the glycol mixture tank before starting to add the Penray inhibitor. A good vortex should be visible to ensure that the powdered components are drawn down into the glycol and don’t just float around in circles on top.

The solid inhibitor blend must be added slowly and distributed evenly into the glycol mixture. Pouring in a steady stream of dry material or dumping in a large amount at once can cause the powder to form gelatinous clumps that are hard to disperse and dissolve. A good way to ensure proper dispersion is to fit a piece of expanded metal with ¼ inch or smaller openings over the tank inlet and allowing the powder to “sift” through it.

Allow the solids to mix with constant agitation for at least 2 hours. Stopping the agitation before all of the solids have dissolved may cause them to settle and stick to the bottom of the tank. A simple way to check for completion is to draw a sample and look for suspended solids. The finished product will be clear when complete.